Dorian3d Ltd | updated 2020
Corporate support
“Help! I need somebody. Help! Not just anybody.” In my experience, organisations draw on external professional support and consultancy input for one of four principal reasons: As a result of an internal capacity constraints or team overload In recognition of an internal capability (expertise) gap To obtain expert confirmation/ validation of a proposed set of business critical actions or plans To bolster credibility with their board, external stakeholders, funders or regulators for high profile, high risk or sensitive plans. To be able to secure the best support, and to secure value for money from an investment in external support, it is essential that an organisation is clear why it needs support, what stype of support it needs and what it expects to achieve as a result of drawing on the support. Knowing there is a problem is not enough and, although it can be appealing, it is rarely possible (or productive) to attempt to “outsource” a business critical problem to a consultant.
My experience I have worked both in and with very large and very small organisations; in government and in the public and private sectors. The internal dynamics of these organisations have varied greatly, as has the degree of political interest and influence exerted over their activities and over decison making. It is essential that the cultural and political dynamics of an organisation are understood and considered when seeking to bring about change and improvement. To resolve most problems it is usually necessary to motivate a change(s) in behaviour, in addition to changing policies, procedures and performance criteria. Examples of past assignments include... Financial diagnosis (what is the size of the financial challenge and what led to it?) Strategy development and review Review of board governance and of board dynamics Financial strategy and review Expert adviser to new healthcare technologies division of global health technologies company Facilitating merger discussions between two large and similar sized organisations
Dorian3d Ltd | updated 2020

Corporate

support

“Help! I need somebody. Help! Not just anybody.” In my experience, organisations draw on external professional support and consultancy input for one of four principal reasons: As a result of an internal capacity constraints or team overload In recognition of an internal capability (expertise) gap To obtain expert confirmation/ validation of a proposed set of business critical actions or plans To bolster credibility with their board, external stakeholders, funders or regulators for high profile, high risk or sensitive plans. To be able to secure the best support, and to secure value for money from an investment in external support, it is essential that an organisation is clear why it needs support, what stype of support it needs and what it expects to achieve as a result of drawing on the support. Knowing there is a problem is not enough and, although it can be appealing, it is rarely possible (or productive) to attempt to “outsource” a business critical problem to a consultant.
My experience I have worked both in and with very large and very small organisations; in government and in the public and private sectors. The internal dynamics of these organisations have varied greatly, as has the degree of political interest and influence exerted over their activities and over decison making. It is essential that the cultural and political dynamics of an organisation are understood and considered when seeking to bring about change and improvement. To resolve most problems it is usually necessary to motivate a change(s) in behaviour, in addition to changing policies, procedures and performance criteria. Examples of past assignments include... Financial diagnosis (what is the size of the financial challenge and what led to it?) Strategy development and review Review of board governance and of board dynamics Financial strategy and review Expert adviser to new healthcare technologies division of global health technologies company Facilitating merger discussions between two large and similar sized organisations